PROVIDENCE, R.I. – The Rhode Island Department of Environmental Management (DEM) announces that permits for the deer hunting season, including the “All Outdoors” package, will go on sale starting Saturday, August 1, online here or at local sales agents.

 

Deer permits are sold as antlered deer (buck) permits or antlerless deer permits. Hunters must have the appropriate deer permit in their possession to legally harvest any antlered or antlerless deer. Deer permits are available for individual purchase or resident hunters may purchase one “All Outdoors” package permit for use in Zones 1 and 2 to take up to seven deer during the established seasons. This option is popular because it gives the hunter flexibility to choose which season(s) to hunt and use their permits. A limit of 350 “All Outdoors” packages will be sold on a first-come, first-served basis. Last year, “All Outdoors” packages sold out within one week of launch. Licenses and permits are available for purchase online or from participating sales agent locations across the state. Applicants must possess a valid hunting license in order to purchase tags, permits, and stamps.

 

The cost of each deer permit for residents is $12.50 online or $13 at a sales agent; for non-residents, the cost is $25.50 online or $26.50 at a sales agent for each permit. The cost for the resident “All Outdoors” package (seven deer permits) is $75 online or $78 at a sales agent. There is an enhanced access fee applied to purchases at sales agent locations. The enhanced access fee is $2 per license and $0.50 per permit for residents; for non-residents, the additional fee is $3 per license and $1 per permit. Enhanced access fees are used to offset the administrative costs to bill, track, and account transactions at sales agent locations and support system development, operation, support, and maintenance. Click here to access the online system or for the list of local sales agents.

 

The deer hunting season kicks off with a youth archery season in Zone 1 on September 12 and 13, followed by the September 15 opener for all archers in Zone 1. Zone 2 opens to youth archers on September 26 and 27 followed by the October 1 opener for all archers. For more information on seasons, bag limits, zones and regulations, click here.

 

In addition to deer permits, hunters will be able to purchase fall archery turkey permits ($7.50 for residents and $20 for non-residents); RI Game Bird permits ($15.50 for residents and non-residents); State Waterfowl Stamps ($7.50 for residents and non-residents); and HIP Permits (no fee) beginning on August 1. These costs do not include the enhanced access fee applied to purchases at sales agent locations.

 

Hunter education is offered as part of the DEM Division of Fish & Wildlife’s Hunter Education Program.  Safety training is required by law in Rhode Island for beginning hunters. To date, more than 40,000 people have completed a hunter safety course in Rhode Island, helping to reduce related accidents in the state and elsewhere. Here is a complete schedule of hunter educational offerings.

 

Hunting has a long tradition in Rhode Island, supporting family customs, connecting people with nature, and attracting tourism to the state. Hunters and anglers purchase around 70,000 licenses, permits, stamps, and tags each year and contribute more than $235 million to Rhode Island’s economy. Revenue generated from license and permit sales support Rhode Island fish and wildlife conservation programs. A critical source of funding, these monies are leveraged to match federal Wildlife and Sport Fish Restoration Program dollars that support outdoor recreational opportunities for fishing, hunting, and boating in Rhode Island.

 

More information about Rhode Island’s hunting and fishing licensing system is available here. The site also acts as a portal to help plan adventures that make the most of Rhode Island’s great outdoors. The site links to information on hunting and fishing opportunities, trails, and natural areas through a variety of maps, as well as certification information for hunter safety and boating safety.

 

For more information on DEM programs and initiatives, visit http://www.dem.ri.gov. Follow us on Facebook at www.facebook.com/RhodeIslandDEM or on Twitter (@RhodeIslandDEM) or Instagram (@ri.fishandwildlife) for timely updates.

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