Museum & Public Library Offer Free Educational Reading Challenge for Students & Families

 

(WOONSOCKET, R.I.) – The Museum of Work and Culture and the Woonsocket Harris Public Library are excited to announce the start of their first Rhode Island History Reading Challenge for students and families from across the region.

 

The Rhode Island History Challenge: Industrialization allows students and families to gamify the reading and educational experience while learning more about Rhode Island’s industrial heritage. Challenges have been created for Early Elementary (K-2), Late Elementary (3-5), Middle School (6-8), and High School (9-12).

 

Each challenge allows students to earn badges while reading, writing, and exploring history hands-on. Badges include: Laying the Foundation (discovering historic background & topic basics), History Makers (exploring the people who shaped the past), Rhode Trip (visiting historic RI sites & monuments), Bridge Builder (making connections between RI history and national or global history), Knowledge is Power (creating connections to current events and shaping the future), Living History (games and activities aimed at play and engagement), and National History Day (activities that make connections to this year’s NHD theme).

 

The program runs through December 18. Participants can register for free by visiting https://woonsocketlibrary.org/ri-history-industrialization/

 

This program is made possible in part by a grant from the U.S. Institute of Museum and Library Services through the RI Office of Library and Information Services, as well as local sponsors The National Park Service and the Blackstone River Valley National Heritage Corridor.

 

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