Rep. Giraldo Introduces Worker-Protection Legislation That Would Make Conditions of Employment More Transparent

 

STATE HOUSE — Rep. Joshua J. Giraldo (D-Dist. 56, Central Falls) has introduced legislation that would protect workers by requiring employers to itemize conditions of employment, including calculation of wages.

The legislation (2021-H 5719) would require the employer, at the time of hiring, to furnish an itemized list of the terms and conditions of the employee's employment. It would also require employers to provide every employee each payday with a paystub explaining exactly how wages were calculated and the reason for each deduction.

“"Every employee deserves to have a clear picture of everything that is included in their paychecks, along with explanations of deductions,” said Representative Giraldo. “This will not only prevent workers from being the victim of wage theft, but also provide a security measure against accidents, which can always happen when computing wages.”

The conditions that would have to be enumerated by the employer include the rate of pay, including whether the employee is paid by the hour, shift, day, week, salary, piece, commission or other method; allowances, if any, for meals and lodging; the policy on sick, vacation, personal leave, holidays and hours; the employment status and whether the employee is exempt from minimum wage and/or overtime; a list of deductions that may be made from the employee’s pay; and the number of days in the pay period and the regularly scheduled payday.

The bill would allow an employee to file a private court action against the employer for a violation of these new disclosures, while also allowing the state to enforce the law on the employees’ behalf.

The legislation, which is co-sponsored by Representatives Karen Alzate (D-Dist. 60, Pawtucket) and Anastasia P. Williams (D-Dist. 9, Providence), has been referred to the House Labor Committee.

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