RIDOT TO LAUNCH PILOT PROGRAM WITH SERVICE PATROL VEHICLES

TO AID MOTORISTS AND HELP REDUCE CONGESTION

 

Starting today, November 14, the Rhode Island Department of Transportation (RIDOT) will begin a pilot program that involves service vehicles patrolling Providence-area highways to help clear disabled vehicles stopped on the side of the road. This is not an on-call service, but rather a RIDOT-directed effort to clear congestion on our highways.

 

As is the model in other states with similar service vehicles, the RIDOT Roadside Responders will patrol high-volume highways in Providence and stop whenever they encounter a disabled vehicle. By getting people on their way as quickly as possible, this will reduce congestion and keep traffic flowing, reduce the risk of secondary crashes, and improve safety.

 

This program is not meant to take the place of any roadside assistance or towing service, such as AAA. Drivers of disabled vehicles should still reach out to their roadside assistance providers as soon as possible after pulling over safely into the shoulder.

      

The Roadside Responder vehicles are specially marked Ford F-350 pickup trucks equipped with safety lights and a variety of tools and supplies to help motorists in need. They will be able to provide fuel, change flat tires, make minor mechanical repairs, jump start a dead battery, or call for a tow truck if needed.

 

The vehicles also will assist first responders by providing traffic control during an incident and provide RIDOT real-time information regarding any potential issues or hazards such as potholes or debris in the road.

 

“These vehicles will be an extra set of hands and extra pair of eyes on our busiest highways,” RIDOT Director Peter Alviti, Jr. said. “By helping others who have the misfortune to break down on the side of the Interstate, we will keep the highways flowing better and safer for all drivers.”

 

Under the pilot program, two vehicles will patrol all of I-195 in Rhode Island and I-95 from the Massachusetts state line in Pawtucket to the Airport Connector in Warwick during peak travel times in the morning (6:30-9:30 a.m.) and evening (3:30-6:30 p.m.), Monday through Friday. RIDOT will dispatch the Roadside Responder vehicles as needed. Each vehicle will be equipped with a GPS device to allow RIDOT to track their location in real-time.

 

RIDOT estimates that every year the Roadside Responder service will save 238,000 hours of vehicle delays, 58,000 gallons of fuel and 580 tons of carbon emissions.

 

Based on the results of the pilot program, RIDOT may expand the services in the future and add more vehicles, increase coverage times or include additional roadways to be patrolled.



There is no cost to motorists who are aided by the Roadside Responder vehicles. RIDOT is funding this program using 80 percent federal funds from the Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act, which provided an additional $575 million to Rhode Island to improve our transportation system and make it safer and more efficient.

 

 

For Immediate Release

November 14, 2023

 

Charles St. Martin

(O): 401-563-4007

(C): 401-641-8934

This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Department of Transportation, Two Capitol Hill Providence, RI 02903 | www.ridot.net

 

 

 

 
James Biden says his brother, President Joe Biden, was never involved in any of his financial deals. James Biden sat down for an hours-long interview with lawmakers on Wednesday as part of the Republican-led impeachment inquiry into the president. He denied claims that President Biden used his official positions to profit from his family's overseas business ventures.        The Biden administration is cancelling one-point-two billion dollars in student loan debt for more than 150-thousand borrowers. While delivering remarks in California on Wednesday, the president said student loan payments have become too burdensome for millions of Americans. The move is the administration's latest effort at student debt relief after the Supreme Court blocked Biden's broader forgiveness plan last year.        New York Attorney General Letitia James says she'll seize Donald Trump's assets if he doesn't pay up after his civil fraud trial. Last week, a judge ordered the former President to pay nearly 355-million-dollars for conspiring to manipulate his net worth to receive tax and insurance benefits. On Tuesday, James told ABC News if Trump doesn't have the funds to pay the fine, she'll ask the judge to seize his assets instead.        United is set to resume a daily flight from Newark to Tel Aviv. It marks the first time since October, when passenger and cargo services were suspended following the attack by Hamas militants on southern Israel. Initial flights on March 2nd and 4th will stop in Munich, with the goal to begin nonstop daily service starting March 6th. United says it will continue to monitor things in Tel Aviv.        The University of Alabama is pausing its IVF services after a recent ruling by the state's Supreme Court. Earlier this week, the Alabama Supreme Court ruled that frozen embryos are children. The decision comes from a 2022 case, where several couples filed a wrongful death lawsuit after frozen embryos were dropped on the floor by a hospital patient.        The trial in the murder of Tupac Shakur is being delayed. On Tuesday, KTNV reported the trial has been pushed back to November. Dwayne "Keefe D" Davis is accused of organizing the murder of Tupac and recently hired a new lawyer. The new attorney asked the judge for more time to review all of the discovery materials involved with Davis' case.