June 25, 2019


MAYOR ANNOUNCES CUMBERLAND HILL ROAD PAVEMENT UPGRADES EXPECTED TO BEGIN SUNDAY, JUNE 30

WOONSOCKET, R.I.: The State Department of Transportation (DOT) estimates it will begin a milling and resurfacing pavement project of Cumberland Hill Road extending from Route 99 to Hamlet Avenue. The estimated start date is Sunday, June 30 from 9 p.m. through 6 a.m. continuing for approximately five weeks.
“The City of Woonsocket eagerly welcomes the start of this much anticipated project,” said Mayor Lisa Baldelli-Hunt. “These wonderful upgrades are attributed to the diligent collaboration and cooperation of the Rhode Island Department of Transportation and State Representative Michael Morin to participate in multiple productive conversations in conjunction with myself and City Public Works (DPW) Director Steven D’Agostino about the pressing need for this project. That selfless group effort is the primary catalyst responsible for bringing these wonderful upgrades into fruition for our City.”
Some daytime improvements to the median and shoulders are expected to be performed between the hours of 9 a.m. and 3 p.m. Two-way traffic will be maintained during daytime construction, according to a DOT press release.
“Governor Raimondo, with whom I am pleased to work, recognizes the importance of road and bridge reconstruction and the valuable importance of Cumberland Hill Road to this community, “added Mayor Baldelli-Hunt. “We appreciate the collective hard work expended to ensure our City receives these much-needed improvements. Let the road work begin!”
The State is expected to utilize 2019 Pavement Preservation funds designated for Cumberland Hill Road to finance the project. DOT earmarked funds for Woonsocket following a series of short-term micro mill improvements that City DPW crews and the Narragansett Improvement Company made along the same stretch of road in 2015.


Office of the Mayor
WOONSOCKET, RHODE ISLAND
City Hall ⬧ P.O. Box B ⬧ Woonsocket, RI 02895
Telephone (401) 767-9205 ⬧ Fax (401) 765-4569 ⬧ E-Mail: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

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