Providence Man Sentenced to Serve 4.5 Years in State Prison on Illegal Firearm Charge

 

PROVIDENCE, R.I. – Attorney General Peter F. Neronha announced that a Providence man was sentenced yesterday in Providence County Superior Court to serve four and a half years at the Adult Correctional Institutions (ACI) for carrying an illegal firearm.  

 

Josten Carey (age 22), pleaded nolo contendere to one count of carrying a pistol without a license.

 

At yesterday’s hearing, Providence County Superior Court Justice Kristin E. Rodgers sentenced Carey to 10 years at the ACI with four and a half years to serve and the balance of the sentence suspended with probation.

 

At the time of his arrest, Carey was on probation after previously pleading to carrying a pistol without a license on January 3, 2019.

 

“Violence involving illegal guns has continued to place Rhode Islanders at risk this year,” said Attorney General Neronha. “That violence is driven by individuals like the defendant here, who repeatedly carry illegal guns, and his sentence of imprisonment is well deserved. I want to thank the Providence Police Department for their continued excellent work in taking another illegal gun of the street and sending a strong message in this case.”

 

Had the case proceeded to trial, the State was prepared to prove beyond a reasonable doubt that on March 18, 2020 Carey was in possession of a loaded handgun before discarding it during a foot chase with officers from the Providence Police Department.

 

On that day, Providence Police attempted to conduct a traffic stop of a vehicle in which Carey was a passenger. The driver of the car failed to stop and attempted to elude a police cruiser for several blocks. The driver then abruptly stopped the vehicle, at which point Carey jumped out and tossed a handgun into a nearby driveway before running away.

 

Officers apprehended Carey after a brief foot chase. They also recovered the loaded Springfield XDM 9mm pistol that Carey had initially tossed before he fled.

 

Investigators Robert Foley and Jonathan Smith of the Providence Police Department’s Violent Crime Task Force led the investigation. Special Assistant Attorney General Katelyn Revens prosecuted the case on behalf of the Office of the Attorney General.

 

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